Amanjena – Marrakesh, Morocco is a Marrakech hotel offering a zen-like atmosphere, exceptional service, romantic dining and seductive views of the Atlas mountains, located 12 kilometres south of Marrakech on the road to Ouarzazate.

Amanjena means ‘peaceful paradise’ and architect Ed Tuttle’s pared down Arabian fantasy certainly conjures an atmosphere of almost zen-like calm with its grand proportions, pleasing symmetry and luxurious finishes.

The pale, peach stone palace with its double-height lounges, library and fountain-focused internal patios reflect Marrakech’s Moorish and Arabian heritage in every graceful keyhole arch, chiselled pillar and ziggurat-style frieze. The subtle, simple colour palette of pink, honey and sage green ensures the rich decorative detailing – écaille de poisson zellige, intricate moucharabieh screens and plâtre ciselé walls – doesn’t overwhelm, making for surprisingly contemporary interiors where the focus remains firmly on the awesome architecture and seductive views of the Atlas mountains.

ACCOMMODATION

Set beneath stuc venitien domes with arched entrances, vaulted ceilings and garden courtyards, Amanjena’s five-star Pavilions and Maisons are cool, elegant dwellings with Berber carpets scattered over zellij-tiled floors. The sound of running water in fountains soothes while chaise longues and candle lanterns lend classic Moroccan ambience. Several offer private heated pools.

Al Hamra Maison

The two-bedroom Al Hamra Maison offers 1,130 square metres (12,163 square feet) of living space and provides a private butler service, a private heated pool and an extensive main pavilion. Features include Berber carpets, Zellij-tiled floors and soaring mirrors.

Maison

Ideal for larger parties, each two-bedroom Maison features seven-metre-high ceilings and offers 360 square metres (3,875 square feet) of living space.

Maison Jardin

Each Maison Jardin features seven-metre-high ceilings and offers 572 square metres (6,157 square feet) of living space, including a garden courtyard and a butler’s pantry.

Pavilions

Pavilions lie beneath their own graceful Venetian stucco domes and are an average size of 175 square metres (1,883 square feet). Each has access to a garden courtyard that overlooks the golf course or olive groves.

Pavilion Piscine

Offering a 25-square-metre (269-square-foot) heated swimming pool and a private garden, 220-square-metre (2,368-square-foot) Pavilion Piscine rooms feature Berber carpets, Zellij-tiled floors and soaring mirrors. Adjacent pool pavilions can be joined together via courtyard doors.

Pavilion Bassin

Pavilion Bassin rooms average 175 square metres (1,883 square feet) and are located next to the central irrigation pool known as the Bassin.

DINING

Both restaurants at the five-star Marrakech resort are decorated with traditional Moroccan elements, from the central, scalloped onyx fountain in the main Restaurant to the coral-hued tadelakt walls draped with Moroccan leather horse saddles in the poolside eatery. Local ingredients and culinary traditions inform the cuisine, complemented by a range of cocktails served at the airy bar, where smoke-tinted mirrors are joined by old Berber daggers and Arabic swords in scabbards of deer antler, camel bone and olive wood.

WELLNESS & SPA

Amanjena’s spa is home to two hammams complemented by showers, washrooms and a glassed-in whirlpool that opens onto a relaxation courtyard with a bubbling fountain.

EXPERIENCES

A varied landscape of rugged snow-capped mountains, parched desert dunes and winding coastline, Morocco has some of North Africa’s most diverse geography, all accessible from the five-star Amanjena resort. The ancient city of Marrakech is centred on its 12th-century medina, a red-walled former fortress crisscrossed by narrow lanes. Its attractions extend outward to the golf courses on the city’s outskirts and the surrounding villages, where little has changed over centuries.

MARRAKESH, MOROCCO

Artisan Heritage

Bahia Palace and the Dar Si Said are a riot of tilework and intricate floral painted-wood ceilings, the Saadian Tombs are enriched by an opulent bounty of marble, while the Musée de Mouassine and Musée de Marrakech are a showcase of swirling stucco and carved-wood design. And if you choose to bed down for a night in a riad, you’ll be able to sleep amid some of this splendour too. Marrakesh is a city steeped in ancient artistry that continues to thrive, kept alive by the modern craftspeople of the souqs and the contemporary art and design scene of the ville nouvelle.

Faith & Culture

You’ll understand how religion permeates the rhythms of daily life when you hear the sonorous call to prayer echo out from the mosques. As an old imperial capital, Marrakesh is home to some beautiful examples of Islamic architecture, most impressively the Ali Ben Youssef Medersa and the Koutoubia minaret. The city also holds on to a heritage of the other religious communities that once helped it become a vibrant caravan town. Head to the old Jewish district of the mellahto visit the Lazama Synagogue and the Miaâra Jewish cemetery to gain a greater understanding of Marrakesh’s cosmopolitan past.

Souq Shopping

Think of the medina’s souqs as a shopping mall, but laid out according to a labyrinthine medieval-era plan. Whether you want to spice up your pantry with North African flavours or buy a carpet to add Moroccan-wow to your house, this magpie’s nest of treasures is manna for shop-til-you-drop fanatics.The main market streets are Souq Semmarine and Souq El Kebir. If you see something you really like there, fine – but understand prices will be higher. Smaller souqs and souqs dedicated to artisan workshops such as Souq Haddadine (Blacksmith’s Souq), where you can buy direct from the producer, generally have the best deals.

The Medina

Got your map ready? Well, it’s probably of little use to you here. Wrapped within the 19 kilometres of powder-pink pisé ramparts, the medina is Marrakesh’s show-stopping sight of crowded souqs, where sheep carcasses swing from hooks next door to twinkling lamps, and narrow, doodling ochre-dusted lanes lead to nowhere. The main artery into this mazy muddle is the vast square of Djemaa El Fna, where it’s carnival night every night. Stroll between snail vendors, soothsayers, acrobats and conjurers, musicians and slapstick acting troupes to discover the old city’s frenetic pulse. The party doesn’t end until the lights go out.


MOROCCO

Mountains & Desert

From Saharan dunes to the peaks of the High Atlas, Morocco could have been tailor-made for travellers. Lyrical landscapes carpet this slice of North Africa like the richly coloured and patterned rugs you’ll lust after in local cooperatives. The mountains – not just the famous High Atlas but also the Rif and suntanned ranges leading to Saharan oases – offer simple, breathtaking pleasures: night skies glistening in the thin air, and views over a fluffy cloudbank from the Tizi n’Test pass. On lower ground, there are rugged coastlines, waterfalls and caves in forested hills, and the mighty desert.

Ancient Medinas

Morocco’s cities are some of the most exciting on the continent. Join the centuries-old trail of nomads and traders to their ancient hearts, from the winding medina maze of Fez to the carnivalesque street-theatre of the Djemaa el-Fna in Marrakesh. In the rocky deserts medinas are protected by kasbahs, on the coast by thick sea walls. But it’s not just a heritage trip, as Morocco’s cities are forward-facing too, with glitzy new urban design in Casablanca, Rabat and Tangier looking to the future as well as paying homage to their roots.

Moroccan Activities

Enjoying Morocco starts with nothing more strenuous than its national pastime – people-watching in a street cafe with a coffee or a mint tea. Use the opportunity to plan your next moves – hiking up North Africa’s highest peak, learning to roll couscous, camel trekking in the desert, shopping in the souqs or getting lost in the medina. Between the activities, you can sleep in boutique riads, relax on panoramic terraces and grand squares, and mop up delicately flavoured tajines – before sweating it all out in a restorative hammam.

Traditional Life

Morocco is a storied country, that has, over the centuries, woven its ties to Sub-Saharan Africa, Europe and the wider Middle East into whole cloth. Its mixed Arab and Berber population forms a strong national identity, but an increasingly youthful one, taking the best of its traditions and weaving the pattern anew – from the countryside to the city, from the call to prayer from the mosque to the beat of local hip hop. Morocco has a hundred faces and sounds, all ready to welcome the traveller looking for spice and adventure.

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