Where To Live In NYC: The Most Exclusive Neighbourhoods | Black Platinum Gold

Do you wonder what are the most exclusive neighborhoods in New York? If so, this post will walk you through exactly where to live in NYC: the most exclusive neighborhoods.

A high price tag has cachet in New York City for certain buyers, like those in the one percent, who think they have landed in the right building in the right neighborhood because the price tag translates into cachet. 

If you have ever lived in New York City then you might have guessed which neighbourhoods topped this year’s list, but some big surprises happened.

The 10 Most Exclusive Neighbourhoods In NYC

# 1 – Upper East Side and Carnegie Hill

Carnegie Hill is in Manhattan Community District 8 and stretches from south to north between 86th and 98th Streets. Andrew Carnegie, who sponsored the Carnegie Institute of Technology at Pittsburg and was a great philanthropist and industrialist, gave the neighborhood its name.

Also nearby is Manhattan’s Upper East Side, a very expensive area. A stroll through the streets of this area is a pleasure because of the upscale boutiques and restaurants. According to demographic data, the vast majority of the residents are white Americans. As Carnegie Hill and the Upper East Side do not clearly define borders, many people consider them one neighborhood.

#2 – Upper West Side

Next on our list is the home of many celebrities, Upper West Side, New York. The Upper West Side (UWS) is bounded by Central Park to the east, the Hudson River to the west, West 110th Street to the north, and West 59th Street to the south. On its south side, it borders Hell’s Kitchen, on its southeast side Columbus Circle, and its north side Morningside Heights.

Located opposite Central Park, the Upper West Side is primarily a residential neighborhood with affluent residents who work in the commercial areas of Midtown and Lower Manhattan. A cultural and intellectual hub similar to Museum Mile on the Upper East Side. The Upper West Side is home to Barnard College and Columbia University. As well as Fiorello H. LaGuardia High School, and Lincoln Center for the Performing Arts.

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#3 – Lincoln Square

The Manhattan Community District 7 is a paradise of pleasing aesthetics. There are multiple studios located in Lincoln Square, including ABC Television Center East, and WABC-TV. There is an impressive lighting display that makes the skyscrapers nearby appear like giants at night.

At the North and South Poles, Barbara Hillary resided, making her the first woman of color to do so. In addition to Central Park, there is also the New York Institute of Technology. There is a large number of tourists who visit the park, where they can see squirrels and locals who run.

#4 – Tribeca, Soho and Little Italy

“Triangle Below Canal Street” is the meaning behind TriBeCa in lower Manhattan, and it was initially written to emphasize the initials of the name. As a response to the September 11th attacks, it hosts every year the Tribeca Film Festival within Manhattan Community District 1. In lower Manhattan, SoHo is also known as South of Houston Street.

A national register of historic places entry was included for the SoHo-Cast Iron Historic District. The area known as Piccola Italia, on the other hand, lies between Tribeca, Soho, Chinatown, and Nolita. If you don’t have an apartment there, you can still get the best pizza there because the place is full of Italians.

#5 – East Midtown and Turtle Bay

East Midtown and Turtle Bay are both very upscale neighborhoods located to its west. There are two famous Tudor apartments in the area, both of which are located in the Manhattan Community District 5 and 6. Vacant storefronts are common in Midtown Manhattan because of the high retail rents.

The history of Turtle Bay stretches back thousands of years. A Dutch colonial governor gave it its name in the 17th century and made it a home for Englishmen. According to estimates, properties there would cost $220,000, leaving other fancy places well behind.

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#6 – West Village

Another diamond has been cut in Manhattan Community District 2. A part of Greenwich Village, West Village is near Houston Street, and the Hudson River. As the last location, it’s still not so affordable since the price per square foot for residential properties is about $2,100. Although it is once again located in the center of New York City, this location has a lot of historical character.

The area took its name from its residential spread in the early 1980s. Known as “Little Bohemia” in 1916, it was a landmark on the map of American bohemian culture. There are a few artistic and colorful neighborhoods in West Village such as Gansevoort Market, Weehawken Street, and Greenwich Village.

#7 – Cobble Hill 

Brooklyn’s picturesque brownstone district of Cobble Hill is in full swing, just south of the borough’s center. 82 percent amounted to an increase in median sales price, and 41 percent arose in the number of transactions. (There were 93 sales in the area in 2019).

Stores and restaurants are clustered along Smith Street, Court Street, and Atlantic Avenue. Along these popular streets, you’ll find cute boutiques, trendy bars, cafes and restaurants, health and wellness businesses, as well as big chains like Trader Joe’s, Michael’s, and Marshall’s. 

#8 – Malba

Located in Whitestone, this waterside community is one of Queens’ most affluent enclaves. It has a suburban feel as it is located along the Whitestone Bridge and sits on Powell Cove, and many of its houses have direct water views. (These homes are sometimes called “mansions.”)

In 2019, there were only 15 sales, which represented a 36 percent increase from the previous year. 

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#9 – Pelham Gardens 

Compared to its counterparts, the Bronx’s most expensive neighborhood is a relative steal with a median sales price of $147,000 only four percent higher than last year.

A small neighborhood with easy access to parks, shopping, and public transportation in the borough.

#10 – Huguenot

Closing out our list is Huguenot. Staten Island’s upscale Protestant neighborhood, named for Protestant immigrants fleeing persecution in the 1500s, had 25 transactions in 2018, down 26 percent from last year. Sales prices grew by seven percent.

There are a lot of high-end houses here, but they’re mostly mansions or large estates near the bay or on Lake Michigan. A lot of the houses along Nicolosi Drive are adorned with marble and have an over-the-top European aesthetic. (Price and housing become more reasonable as you go inland.) 

Bunker Ponds Park and Wolf’s Pond Park provide a lot of green space in the surrounding area. 

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